Acerpure Pro Vero (AP353-10W) review

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8.8Expert Score
Purer air, but at a cost

The Acerpure Pro Vero is a relatively compact and quiet air purifier, but at its price you would expect some smart connectivity features.

Design
8.5
Performance
9
Pros
  • Compact design
  • Effortless to use
  • Easy controls
Cons
  • No smart features
  • Pricey for what you get
  • No voice control

The launch of Acer’s Acerpure home appliance range earlier this year was an interesting move for a company typically associated with high-end computing in Australia.

The Acerpure Pro Vero air purifier is a compact unit made from eco-friendly materials, which can reportedly remove PM2.5 and formaldehyde particles from your home’s air.

The Pro Vero is a straightforward appliance, offering air purification for medium-sized rooms up to 47.5m².

You can almost set and forget, and while it seems to do a pretty good job circulating air, it lacks any advanced smart functionality, which can be found in similarly priced models from reasonable brands.

Acerpure air purifier

Design

The design team has focused on simplicity for the Acerpure Pro Vero. A simple cylinder measuring 253 × 253 × 576 mm, the Pro Vero has a single port for its AC cable, and a simple circle touch panel on top for controls. 

It weighs 4.2 kg and while it doesn’t feature wheels for easy movement, its compact shape and weight mean you can move it around fairly easily.

There’s no advanced or complicated systems to adjust things, which shows how this is a device aimed at anyone looking for the best air purifier

From a specs’ perspective, the purifier has a Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of 324 m³/hour, with three main fan speed options as well as a “Smart” mode.

You get three stages of filtration, capable of removing PM2.5 and formaldehyde particles. 

The exterior is made from 35% Post-Consumer Recycled materials, which lowers the overall environmental impact of the product. 

Around the lower 2/3rds of the purifier’s body is a network of holes which allow for air to be sucked into the purifier. The top of the device is an open grill, where air is pushed out from a fan you can see spinning around inside.

The control panel is a simple affair, with two touch sensitive buttons. One is power, and the other is used to control the fan speed. A long press of the fan button puts the Pro Vero into night mode for quiet operation.

Around the display is a coloured indicator of the air quality, which highlights green when it’s good, red when it’s bad and orange when it’s in between.

Close up of the control panel of the Acerpure Pro Vero

No smart functionality

While simplicity is key for any appliance, and the Acerpure is definitely easy to use, I was disappointed there was no Smart Control functionality for the purifier, especially at the price. 

Similarly priced options include app control and more detailed information on the display, including the particle sizes it’s seeing and the surrounding air quality.

There’s also no voice control through Google Home or Alexa, so you can’t turn it on remotely.

The fan inside the Acerpure Pro Vero circulates well

Performance

Without a proper lab setup, it’s actually really difficult to state with any definitive evidence how well the Acerpure Pro Vero is at removing air particles from a room.

In fact, for the bulk of the time I was testing, I left the product in the “Green” (or smart) mode to automatically adjust its performance based on air quality. In that time, I only saw it kick out of the green air quality standard once, and that only lasted a couple of minutes. 

To try to get a slightly better indication, I set the end of a wooden skewer on fire in front of the purifier. It took about 15 seconds to detect the smoke, but it dropped to the red zone pretty quickly. 

It took about a minute to bring the air quality back to green, and while I could still smell the charred wood sitting in my hand, it wasn’t obvious in the air.

That’s probably not scientific enough to judge its performance, but anecdotally, I believe it performs quite well at its job of clearing the air of particles.

Because it’s smaller than something like the Samsung AX46 I reviewed last year, it’s also nice and quiet. Acer claims it operates between 25 dB and 56 dB.

The Pro Vero next to a hall console

Verdict

The Acerpure Pro Vero is a decent enough barebones air purifier. It seems to do a good job of clearing out particles from the air, though it’s hard to say that for certain.

But what I find most difficult with this product is what’s missing. You get no real indication of air quality apart from a three-stage colour indicator. There’s no smart connectivity. There’s only a 3-stage filter rather than 4-stage. There’s no voice control.

If you compare this to a different device built for a similarly sized room, like the Breville Viral Protect Plus Purifier, you can see that the Acerpure’s RRP is too high.

Acer is asking for $369 for this purifier. Breville is asking for $399. But Breville’s model offers smart connectivity, including Google Home and Alexa control, and a 4-stage filter.

I haven’t tested the Breville to know if it’s any good, but purely on a specs’ perspective, the Acerpure falls behind.

While you can pick up both models for less if you shop around, I feel the price here holds back the Acer model. At $250, it could arguably be a good budget option. 

At its current price, you may be better off looking at alternatives, though if you have the money and aren’t phased by its lack of features, it seems to do a good job for medium sized-rooms.

Buy the Acerpure Pro Vero (AP353-10W) online

The Acerpure Pro Vero is available at Bing Lee and the Acer store.

AU $195.00
+ Delivery *
* Delivery cost shown at checkout.
Product disclosure

Acer supplied the product for this review.

Author

  • Nick Broughall

    Nick is the founder and editor of BTTR. He is an award winning product reviewer, who has spent the last 20 years writing, editing and publishing technology and consumer content for brands like Finder, Gizmodo and TechRadar.

    View all posts
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